Buzzing with Questions

The Inquisitive Mind of Charles Henry Turner

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ISBN: 9781629795584

Format:

Published by (2019-11-05)

The story of Charles Henry Turner, the first Black entomologist — a scientist who studies bugs — is told in this fascinating book for young readers.

Can spiders learn? How do ants find their way home? Can bugs see color? All of these questions buzzed endlessly in Charles Henry Turner’s mind. He was fascinated by plants and animals and bugs. And even when he faced racial prejudice, Turner did not stop wondering. He constantly read, researched, and experimented.  

Author Janice Harrington and artist Theodore Taylor III capture the life of this inspiring scientist and educator in this nonfiction picture book, highlighting Turner's unstoppable quest for knowledge and his passion for science. The extensive back matter includes an author's note, time line, bibliography, source notes, and archival images.

A NSTA/CBC Best STEM Book

Book Details

Format: Hardcover
Price: 18.99 USD / 24.99 CAD
Published: 2019-11-05
ISBN: 9781629795584
Imprint:
Page Count: 48
Trim Size: 8-1/2 x 11
Grades:
Ages:

★ "A relatively unknown entomologist comes out of oblivion in this engaging picture book biography. Harrington’s text is inviting, and Turner’s enthusiasm comes through clearly... Taylor’s bright, cheerful, expertly rendered cartoon illustrations complement the text. Harrington and Taylor have rescued a worthy scientist from obscurity." -- School Library Journal, starred review 

"A thorough biography of early African American scientist Charles Henry Turner... (the) extensively researched, jam-packed text intrigues and inspires with Turner's example of discovery and hard-won, meaningful contributions to knowledge about life. A well-written tribute to a deserving champion of science." -- Kirkus Reviews

"Full-color digital illustrations and Harrington’s conversational, sometimes lyrical prose tell the story of 'indefatigable' African-American entomologist and zoologist Charles Henry Turner... fascinating..." -- Publishers Weekly 

 

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